Home 5 Clinical Diagnostic Insider 5 New Bio-Ink Improves Cell Viability in Bioprinting

Researchers from the University of Wollongong (Australia) have advanced the realm of bioprinting with the development of a new improved bio-ink capable of printing living human cells into three-dimensional structures, according to a study published in the November issue of Biomaterials Science. The new bio-ink improves the viability of the cells. “To date, none of the available inks has been optimized in terms of both printability and cell suspending ability,” said Cameron Ferris, co-author and associate researcher at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, in a statement. “Our new bio-ink is printable and cell-friendly, preventing cell settling and allowing controlled deposition of cells.” The bio-ink is based on a biopolymer and two surfactants in a standard tissue culture medium. The ink was able to reproducibly print different cell types from commercial inkjet print heads, the researchers reported. For more information on how advances in bioprinting will affect laboratories, please see Inside the Diagnostics Industry on page 5.

Researchers from the University of Wollongong (Australia) have advanced the realm of bioprinting with the development of a new improved bio-ink capable of printing living human cells into three-dimensional structures, according to a study published in the November issue of Biomaterials Science. The new bio-ink improves the viability of the cells. “To date, none of the available inks has been optimized in terms of both printability and cell suspending ability,” said Cameron Ferris, co-author and associate researcher at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, in a statement. “Our new bio-ink is printable and cell-friendly, preventing cell settling and allowing controlled deposition of cells.” The bio-ink is based on a biopolymer and two surfactants in a standard tissue culture medium. The ink was able to reproducibly print different cell types from commercial inkjet print heads, the researchers reported. For more information on how advances in bioprinting will affect laboratories, please see Inside the Diagnostics Industry on page 5.

Subscribe to Clinical Diagnostics Insider to view

Start a Free Trial for immediate access to this article